The Dog Adoption Network

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dog breed rescueChoosing the right dog can be a tedious mission, but it’s important to find the perfect match. Dog adoption process is all about looking for that special dog to share your life with. There are many things that can go wrong if you don’t do the research on the right dog for you. One, it’s a waste of time and money. Second, shelters don’t want to see another dog being returned or given up on again. There are two types of dogs to choose to adopt from, pure breed dogs and mix dogs, or mutts. Selecting the right dog will take background research and also knowledge of the type of lifestyle the dog had prior to adopting.

There are many mutts or mix dog breeds waiting to be adopted. Finding the background and history of a mutt can be tricky and/or confusing. By far there are more benefits to adopting a mutt than a pure breed. Mutts tend not to suffer as many health problems as pure breeds, such as diseases and genetic disorders. Put it this way, you get two or more breeds for the price of one, and one generally with better health.

Pure breeds, however, are easier to research their background and are more predictable. The American Kennel Club, or AKC, recognizes many of these pure breeds and also has information of their background and origination. Pure breeds are divided into different groups:

The sporting groups are naturally energetic and alert. Many have extraordinary intuitions in the water and the woods. All of theses breeds require regular exercise.

The hound groups were originally created to hunt. Many have amazing abilities like speed and smell. Similar to the sporting groups, hounds are naturally active and watchful. Exercise and mental challenges are a must!

The working group are dogs that where bred to perform jobs like guarding, pulling sleds, and performing rescues. Working dogs are quick learners, have strong solid bodies and make great companions. Because the majority of working dogs are large breeds, do evaluate all the possibilities: food, exercise, space, family, etc.

The terrier group is mostly composed of small or medium size dogs. Their tolerance level toward other dogs and children is low but by socializing them at an early age their tolerance level can be increase. The majority of them do require special grooming since they have wiry coats. Their energy level varies and personality too.

The toy group is composed of small or diminutive size dogs and many are feisty little things. This group is appropriate for small or compact homes. It is preferable not to adopt a toy dog if you have small children. Exercise is not as necessary but it is important. The cost and care for toy dogs is less than a larger dog.

The non-sporting group varies in size, coat, and personality too. There are no specifics on how they’re supposed to look and overall appearance. They weren’t bred for any specific purpose. However, non-sporting dogs are meant to be great companion.